HappyHolidays

Happy Holidays and a Healthy New Year!

As 2016 comes to a close, we are thankful for all our clients, who are the center of the Medfusion family.  We’re sharing family-favorite recipes from some of our Medfusion employees and we hope they’ll become part of your holiday traditions.

Our recipes include something healthy, something boozy, and something sweet–so cheers to you and yours!

Insalada Mandarino
by Kim Labow, Medfusion CEO

serves 6 as a side salad/appetizer

Dressing:
¼ cup good quality olive oil
2 Tablespoons cider vinegar
2 Tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon salt
Dash of Tabasco sauce

Salad:
½ cup sliced or slivered almonds
3 Tablespoons sugar
1 head of Romain lettuce (or bag of prepped Romaine)
11 oz. can of mandarin oranges, drained
½ cup celery, chopped (optional)
2 scallions, chopped (optional)

In a small pan over medium heat, you’ll want to candy the almonds. Put the almonds and sugar together and stir constantly until the almonds are coated and the sugar is dissolved. The can burn quickly so keep a good watch on them. Place them on a sheet of wax or parchment paper to cool. Store for later use.

Combine all dressing ingredients together and chill.

Toss all ingredients together just before serving.  Romaine will wilt quickly if left to sit in the dressing!

NOTE: add roasted chicken/rotisserie chicken for an extra boost of protein or to make this an entree salad.

 


 

Fig ‘n Nuts cocktail
by Reid Archer, Medfusion Client Relationship Manager
serves 1 very happy person

2 oz. good Rye Whiskey
1 teaspoon fig-infused simple syrup (see note below)
2 dashes walnut bitters
Twist of orange peel

In an old fashioned glass, combine simple syrup and bitters. Fill glass halfway with ice and stir about a dozen times. Add enough ice to fill the glass. Squeeze orange peel over the glass to extract the oils and then add the peel to the glass.  Add whiskey and stir until the drink is cold and everything is combined.  Enjoy!

NOTE: fig-infused simple syrup is easy to make and worth the little bit of effort!
Combine a dozen figs, stems removed and then quartered with 1 cup of sugar and ½ cup of water in small saucepan over medium-high heat.  Stir until the sugar starts to dissolve and figs begin to soften.  Mash the figs while stirring until the sugar has fully dissolved and the figs are breaking apart. Remove from the heat and allow to sit, covered, for 30 minutes.  Strain into a clean mason jar, cover and keep refrigerated for up to 2 weeks (or until you use it all in your cocktails!)

 


 

Grandma’s Famous Carrot Cake
by Shonda Eason, Medfusion Client Relationship Manager
serves ~12

Nonstick vegetable oil spray
½ cup golden raisins (optional)
3 tablespoons dark rum (optional)
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 pound carrots, peeled, coarsely grated
1 cup buttermilk, room temperature
2½ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons ground ginger
½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
2 teaspoons baking powder
1½ teaspoons kosher salt
¾ teaspoon baking soda
4 large eggs, room temperature
1 cup granulated sugar
¾ cup (packed) dark brown sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
¾ cup vegetable oil

Frosting And Assembly

12 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
¾ cup (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Generous pinch of kosher salt
4 cups powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 350°. Lightly coat two 9-inch diameter cake pans with nonstick spray. Line bottoms with parchment paper rounds; lightly coat rounds with nonstick spray. If using raisins and rum, heat together in a small saucepan over low just until warm, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit until liquid is absorbed and raisins are plump, 15–20 minutes.

Meanwhile, toast walnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until golden brown, 8–10 minutes; let cool. Combine carrots and buttermilk in a medium bowl.

Whisk flour, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in a large bowl. Using an electric mixer on high speed, beat eggs, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and vanilla extract until pale and thick, about 4 minutes. Reduce speed to medium-low and gradually stream in oil. Add dry ingredients in 3 additions, alternating with carrot mixture in 2 additions, beginning and ending with dry ingredients; mix until smooth. Fold in raisins, if using, and walnuts with a rubber spatula. Scrape batter into prepared pans.

Bake cakes, rotating pans halfway through, until a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 35–45 minutes. Transfer pans to a wire rack and let cakes cool 10 minutes. Run a knife around sides of cakes and invert onto wire rack; remove parchment. Let cool completely.

Using an electric mixer on high speed, beat cream cheese and butter in a medium bowl until smooth, about 1 minute. Beat in vanilla extract and salt. Reduce speed to low and gradually mix in powdered sugar. Increase speed to high and beat frosting until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes.

Place 1 cake, domed side down, on a platter. Spread ¾ cup frosting evenly over top. Place remaining cake, domed side down, on top. Spread top and sides with 1¼ cups frosting and chill 30 minutes to let frosting set. Spread remaining frosting over top and sides.

Share with family and friends and enjoy!

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